Fine Arts’ Utilization of Twitter

The fine arts industry and the fashion industry are very similar in that they both are creative industries that sometimes have overlapping audiences. In fashion, Twitter is a highly-used social media tool that connects designers and buyers together. In the fine arts industry, Twitter is used to connect artists and buyers as well. It updates followers on upcoming events and helps build relationships via social media. In the article, Rendezvous With Art and Ardent, young New York City art professionals keep up with Twitter to find the most current art exhibits and gallery openings. The Twitter hashtag #artstech is one example, explained in the article, that they utilize in order to keep up. Tweeting has helped museums, such as the Guggenheim, connect with Twitter followers by sharing ideas via tweets and creating professional and personal relationships with their followers. This has led to learning and collaboration among the fine arts community. Twitter has also benefited art organizations; they can attend and support other art organizations in the city. There is no doubt that Twitter has increased communication and collaboration within the fine arts industry, and for many other industries as well, and is a solid technique that can be used successfully.

In 12 Compelling Reasons Why Artists Should Use Twitter, Lori McNee explains the benefits of artists using Twitter to maximize their business. Being an artist isn’t just about creating art, it is also about running a successful business. Twitter is one of the quickest ways to implement brand recognition. Artists can promote themselves and their art, connect with potential buyers and communicate with new audiences. Networking, promoting your website, sharing your art with tweeting tools and applications, and targeting your niche audience are a few examples Lori shares in her blog post. For more insight on how to be a successful artist, read the article and start tweeting!

— written by Liz Bixby

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